Tag Archive: Google


Google HummingbirdOn September 27, Google celebrated its 15th birthday. It celebrated by announcing its latest major update to its algorithm, Hummingbird. Google began releasing Hummingbird in August of this year, but it didn’t make a formal announcement until now.

So as usual, marketers, SEOs, writers, and others in Internet nerdom immediately began to delve into this new algorithm to see what this will mean for Google rankings. According to Google, Hummingbird represents a major leap in the understanding of the conversational human language as a whole, as opposed to looking for few keywords here and there. This is due in large part to the use of voice commands on smartphones. While it is just my opinion, I can’t help but think this is an effort to compete with Apple’s Siri. It also tells me that websites better have quality content an avoid black-hat techniques like keyword stuffing.

According to Amit Singhal, Google senior vice president, Hummingbird is more about indexing and less about page ranking and indexing. This is a major paradigm shift from previous versions of the algorithm.

Now I have always looked at page rank and pages indexed, so I am curious to see how SERPs adjust moving forward.

One thing is for sure – as usual, Google is going to keep us guessing.

Putting a Value on the Top Spot in Google

I heard an SEO nerd-type joke not too long ago:

Where do you hide a dead body? Page three of Google search results.

While it is funny to those of us who do SEO and online marketing for a living, it does make an important point. The further back you are on search result pages, the less likely anyone is going to find you.

It can be hard, however, to explain this to business owners and potential clients. These are intangibles that can take a long time to build up. A recent study released by Chitika works to quantify the value of number one position in Google.

According to the study, a website with the first position in the search results contributed to 33 percent of the traffic, compared to 18 percent for the second position. The third position drops to 11 percent and the fourth is a dismal 5.4 percent.

So what does this mean?

There is a a direct correlation between the rank in search results and the amount of traffic a site will receive. And as we all know, the more traffic a site receives, the better the chances of a closed sale or potential customer.

Now this doesn’t mean that getting to that top spot, regardless of the keyword or phrase, will be easy. This is where having a solid SEO strategy and quality website content comes into play. But this study just provide proof that it is worth the effort.

Spam Comments and SEO

Image credit: Siddartha Thota

I will openly admit it – one of the hardest parts of SEO for me has always been link building. Mainly because I always want to make sure the links I create are high quality and not considered “spammy.” In light of Google’s rollout of Penguin, it confirmed in my mind that I was doing the right thing. So I am stunned when I see comments with links like this:

“What a wonderful piece of information Admiring the time and effort you put into your blog and detailed information you offer! I will bookmark your blog and have my children check up here often. Thumbs up!”

For those of you who aren’t aware, I have a blog that talks about fiber arts, crochet, yarn spinning, and the like called The Fiber Forum. This is a comment I received on a post about a book review. Obviously this has NOTHING to do with my blog and is a failed attempt at getting a link. I wouldn’t do that to someone else’s blog and I am always annoyed when someone tries to treat my blogs as link building opportunities.

Now I will say I understand how frustrating it can be when you are working hard to build a solid website following white hat techniques and you don’t get any traction in search engine results. It can be even more stressful when you have a client that expects to see results quickly and those of us who do this for a living knows there is no such thing as an “overnight success.” Can it be tempting to go black hat? I guess. Is it worth it? In my opinion, absolutely not.

As frustrating as it can be, I will definitely continue to follow the moral of the story of “the tortoise and the hare.” Slow and steady wins the race.

At the ICANN board meeting in Singapore today, a vote that was held that will change how future domain names will be created. Anyone can now create a new generic top level domain (TLD)…as long as you have $185K. The Board vote was 13 approving, 1 opposed, and 2 abstaining. Applications for new gTLDs will be accepted from 12 January 2012 to 12 April 2012.

What does this mean? General Motors can now create a “.gm” domain. Coke can have a “.coke” domain. The possibilities are endless. There are many arguments both for and against this new plan. Some argue that banks and other financial institutions could use a branded domain to help avoid fraud. Luxury brands could use a branded domain to help ensure customers are purchasing real goods and help reduce counterfeit products. Both are valid arguments.

Personally, I this will not work in the long run. First, only big companies will have the money to purchase a “vanity domain” (which is what it really is), ultimately pushing out competition from smaller companies. Honestly, I am curious as to how the board came up with the $185K price tag.

Second, I am curious how search engines like Google, Bing, and the like will rate these new domains in organic search. I would think they would automatically get a high page rank, since it is what I would consider a “qualified” domain. In my opinion, this is the same as an uber-expensive PPC campaign that is mixed in with organic results. These new domains won’t have to go through all the traditional tried-and-true SEO best practices, which will again, push small businesses further down in organic results. Google just finished attempting to level the playing field after the JC Penny mess that took place this past Christmas season.

ICANN said they will work hard to address all the concerns that have been brought to their attention.  I certainly hope they do.